Seyfarth Shaw Partner Jordan Vick is on the panel for the “Playing by the Rules: Rule Changes Essential to Your Practice” session on Friday, November 16, at Georgetown Law’s 15th annual Advanced eDiscovery Institute in Washington, D.C.

Session topics include:

  • The 2015 Amendments to the FRCP and their actual impacts on practitioners, including unintended consequence
  • How the changes to Federal Rule of Evidence 902 will change how parties and the court can streamline authentication of ESI and potentially eliminate the need to call a witness at trial
  • What other changes the Rules Committee is discussing that may impact eDiscovery professionals
  • Pilot accelerated disclosures and their impacts in Illinois and Arizona, including the Mandatory Initial Discovery Pilot Program (“MIDP”) in the Northern District of Illinois

For more information, to see the full schedule, or to register, click here.

Seyfarth Shaw Offers Data Privacy & Protection in the EU-U.S. Desktop Guide and On-Demand Webinar Series

On May 25, 2018, the EU General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) will impose significant new obligations on all U.S. companies that handle personal data of any EU individual. U.S. companies can be fined up to €20 million or 4% of their global annual revenue for the most egregious violations. What does the future passage of GDPR mean for your business?

Seyfarth’s eDiscovery and Information Governance (eDIG) and Global Privacy and Security (GPS) practitioners are pleased to announce the release of Data Privacy & Protection in the EU-U.S.: What Companies Need to Know Now, which describes GDPR’s unique legal structure and remedies, and includes tips and strategies in light of the future passage of the GDPR.

How to Get Your Desktop Guide:

To request the Data Privacy & Protection in the EU-U.S. Desktop Guide as a pdf or hard copy, please click the button below:

GDPR Webinar Series

Throughout August and October of 2017, Seyfarth Shaw’s attorneys provided high-level discussions on risk assessment tools and remediation strategies to help companies prepare and reduce the cost of EU GDPR compliance. Each segment is one hour long and can be accessed on-demand at Seyfarth’s Carpe Datum Law Blog and The Global Privacy Watch Blog.

For updates and insight on GDPR, we invite you to click here to subscribe to Seyfarth’s Carpe Datum Law Blog and here to subscribe to Seyfarth’s The Global Privacy Watch Blog.

Seyfarth eDiscovery Partner Richard Lutkus, along with William Lederer from Relativity and Patrick Zeller of Gilead Sciences, Inc., will host a panel discussion titled “Brave New Words: Cloud Data Collection, Processing, and Hosting” at this year’s RelativityFest on October 24, 2017.

This session will provide attendees with information about new data collection methods with tools like Heureka and Harvester, along with considerations for working with RelativityOne, data privacy, and security. Additionally, best practices surrounding the General Data Privacy Regulation (GDPR), international data transfer with EU entities, secure management of hosting (wiping cloud data) and SSD wiping technologies will be discussed.

RelativityFest is an annual conference designed to educate and connect the e-discovery community. The three-day festival in Chicago will feature panel discussions, hands-on labs, and breakout sessions to discuss best practices. For more information, or to register to attend, please visit https://relativityfest.com/.

In his last week in the Office, President Obama issued a report on data privacy and cybersecurity, “Privacy in Our Digital Lives: Protecting Individuals and Promoting Innovation” (January 2017). The report serves as a high-level overview on how people’s interaction with technology has changed in the last several years and what the government has done to protect individual privacy while advancing economy and national security. The report also highlighted the path forward. Many of the initiatives currently in the works or yet to come will require strong cooperation between the government and the private sector.

Some of the data-privacy highlights pointed out in the report are:

  • Financial Privacy. The BuySecure Initiative announced by President Obama in 2014, which encouraged the deployment of new security technology (e.g., chip-and-PIN cards) for payments made in the United States.
  • Broadband Privacy. New rules approved by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) that give consumers more control over how Internet Service Providers (ISPs) use their data, requiring ISPs to obtain user consent before sharing sensitive information they collect with advertisers and other third parties.
  • Drone Privacy. Six Federal entities that use government-operated drones – the Departments of Defense, Homeland Security, the Interior, Justice and Transportation, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration – have put in place privacy policies for their use of drones pursuant to President Obama’s 2015 Presidential Memorandum on safeguarding privacy in domestic use of unmanned aircraft systems.
  • Children’s Privacy. The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), enacted in 1998, was modernized in 2012 to address changes in technology and better protect online privacy of children under the age of 13.
  • Student Privacy. President Obama’s Student Privacy Pledge has been signed by over 250 companies, including some of the Nation’s largest, that have agreed to limit collection and sharing of student data.
  • International Commercial Privacy. The Obama Administration has undertaken a big task of putting in place the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield framework, which involved months of drafting and negotiations with the EU authorities. The Privacy Shield’s provision of comprehensive privacy protections, backed by FTC enforcement, was key to ensure that cross-border commercial data transfers continued after the invalidation of Safe Harbor.
  • Legislative Reforms. In 2015, President Obama signed into law the USA Freedom Act, which ended the U.S. Intelligence Community’s collection of bulk telephony metadata under the USA Patriot Act. The USA Freedom Act creates a more targeted approach whereby the government would generally require judicial permission to access call records held by telecommunications providers.

The Report also included “Areas for Further Attention,” which the Obama Administration hoped the new Administration would focus upon. These Areas are as follows:

Continue Reading The White House Report on Data Privacy Identifies “Areas for Further Attention”