Introduction

On June 10, 2021, China officially passed China’s first Data Security Law, which will take effect on September 1, 2021. Following the introduction of the Data Security Law, together with the Cybersecurity Law, which has been implemented since June 1, 2017, and the Personal Information Protection Law, which is undergoing public comment

Seyfarth Synopsis:  On May 12, 2021, President Joe Biden issued a very broad, 34 page “Executive Order on Improving the Nation’s Cybersecurity.” The Executive Order, or “EO”, can be found here. This order comes six months after the notorious SolarWinds attack, and mere weeks after other high-profile attacks have invaded our networks

In our May blog post, we took issue with the broadcast statement that ‘consumer privacy law was sweeping the country and that other states were jumping on the California Consumer Privacy Law (CCPA) bandwagon to enact their own state law.’ The problem as we saw it, was that the truth behind these sensationalistic statements was a bit more nuanced than people were led to believe. Most states, we found, that introduced consumer privacy legislation simply did not follow through, either by outright killing the legislation (MS) or by taking a step back with a wait and see approach (see TX). Nevada, by contrast, did neither. Instead, its legislature enacted its own consumer privacy solution, through SB 220, or as we call it, ‘the limited privacy amendment.’ We’ve opted to discuss Nevada’s approach here primarily because of its more restrictive application online and because its October 1, 2019, operational date is a full three months before the CCPA becomes operational.

First, the limited privacy amendment is not the CCPA. Let’s make that perfectly clear. True, it was modeled on the opt-out section of the CCPA, but it isn’t a mirror copy as it amends existing law. There are three primary areas operators conducting business over the Internet need to be aware of, when evaluating compliance measures:  
Continue Reading Nevada: Bucking the Wait and See Approach to Consumer Privacy Law

Senate Bill 561, which would have generated even greater compliance challenges and litigation risk for businesses, has been held in committee and placed on suspense. This development effectively prevents the bill from advancing for a vote and is a bit of CCPA good news for businesses. It also serves as a minor setback to consumer

Cross-Posted from The Global Privacy Watch Blog

In Part 1 of our ‘Texas Joins the Privacy Fray’ series, we focused on the Texas Consumer Privacy Act. Here, we shine the light on the Texas Privacy Protection Act (HB 4390).

The TXPPA is distinguishable from both the TXCPA and the CCPA because the applicability threasholds are different. For the TXPPA to apply, a business must 1) be doing business in Texas; 2) have more than 50 employees; 3) collect personally identifiable information (“PII”) of more than 5,000 individuals, households, or devices (or has it collected on the business’s behalf); and 4) meet one of the following two criteria – the business’ annual gross revenue exceeds $25 million; or the business derives 50% or more of its annual revenue from processing PII.
Continue Reading And Texas joins the Privacy Fray – Part 2 (or, Everything is Bigger in Texas…)

Cross-Posted from The Global Privacy Watch Blog

Last month, Texas saw the introduction of not one, but TWO privacy bills in the Texas state legislature: The Texas Consumer Privacy Act (TXCPA) and the Texas Privacy Protection Act (TXPPA). With news of this likely meeting with a collective groan and shoulder shrug, we do have some good news for you.

Both bills’ foundations are set with familiar CA Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”) language. Unfortunately, this is also bad news because they both suffer from the same problems found in the CCPA – we’ll explain below. It’s also still early in the game, with the bills having just been filed in the state legislature. Given that there is time in the legislative session for amendments to be made and especially considering the ‘ring-side’ view Texas lawmakers have to the CA legislative and Attorney General rule/procedure process currently unfolding, it would be unreasonable not to expect changes. Finally, the bills are reactive responses to the national (or international) focus on privacy issues of late and may allow impacted businesses a grace period, as we’ve seen in the CCPA. In this blog, we shine the light on the first of these bills: The Texas Consumer Privacy Act.
Continue Reading And Texas Joins the Privacy Fray – Part 1 (or, the Elephant in the room just got a LOT bigger…)

Seyfarth Shaw Offers Data Privacy & Protection in the EU-U.S. Desktop Guide and On-Demand Webinar Series

On May 25, 2018, the EU General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) will impose significant new obligations on all U.S. companies that handle personal data of any EU individual. U.S. companies can be fined up to €20 million or 4%

On May 25, 2018, the EU General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) will impose significant new obligations on all U.S. companies that handle personal data of any EU individual. U.S. companies can be fined up to €20 million or 4% of their global annual revenue for the most egregious violations. What does the future passage of GDPR mean for your business?

Our experienced eDiscovery and Information Governance (eDIG) and Global Privacy and Security (GPS) practitioners will present a series of four 1-hour webinars in August through October of 2017. The presenters will provide a high-level discussion on risk assessment tools and remediation strategies to help prepare and reduce the cost of EU GDPR compliance.
Continue Reading Is your organization ready for the new EU General Data Protection Regulation?

This week, the European Commission released its proposal to repeal the existing Regulation on Privacy and Electronic Communication (the ePrivacy Directive (Directive 2002/58/EC)) and to replace it with a new Regulation. Unlike the current EU Data Directive and the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) effective May 2018, the ePrivacy Directive primarily addressed practices of traditional telecommunication providers and new providers of electronic communication services (e.g., Gmail, and others listed below). The reason behind the proposal is to catch up the existing law to the realities of the technological evolution that occurred since the passage of the ePrivacy Directive. The proposal is also expected to ensure consistency in the protections afforded by the ePrivacy Directive, particularly with respect to confidentiality of communications, with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which will take effect in May 2018.

The two most impactful proposed changes are: (1) extension of the application of privacy rules from traditional telecommunications operators to the new providers of electronic communications services, such as Gmail, Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp, and others, and (2) simplification of the rules on cookies. The former proposal would prevent email services, such as Gmail, from scanning the contents of their users’ email for the purposes of delivering targeted advertising, without obtaining the users’ explicit consent. Obviously, this could significantly impact ad revenue of online email and messaging services that rely on targeted advertising for their funding.

The simplification of cookie rules, however, is a welcome relief to business. Article 5(3) of the current ePrivacy Directive requires websites to obtain prior informed consent from a user before storing cookies and similar technologies (e.g., web beacons, Flash cookies, etc.) or accessing information stored on the user’s terminal equipment. For consent to be valid, it must be informed, specific, freely given, and must constitute a real indication of the individual’s wishes. Certain cookies are exempt from the consent requirement, including user-input cookies (session ID first-party cookies), authentication cookies (to identify the user for the duration of a session), user-interface customization cookies (e.g., language or font preferences, for the duration of a session), and third-party social plug-in content-sharing cookies (for logged-in members of a social network). In other words, cookies that are used for the sole purpose of carrying out the transmission of a communication, or are necessary to provide the requested service are likely to be exempt. Some businesses, however, read this exemption narrowly and request user consent even for the use of these “experience-enhancing” cookies.


Continue Reading Goodbye Cookie Banners? The European Commission Proposes to Simplify the Cookie Law

The Irish Data Protection Commissioner (DPC) has issued guidance on compliance with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which will come into force on May 25, 2018 and replace the existing European data protection framework under the EU Data Protection Directive.  The new data privacy regime is expected to result in enhanced transparency, accountability, and individuals’ rights, while optimizing organizational approach to governance and management of data protection as a corporate issue.

The guidance, titled “The GDPR and You, General Data Protection Regulation, Preparing for 2018,” urges all organizations to not delay the preparation for the GDPR and to “immediately start preparing for the implementation of GDPR by carrying out a ‘review and enhance’ analysis of all current or envisaged processing in line with GDPR.”  Proper preparation for the GDPR may help avoid regulatory fines, which can range up to €20,000,000 or 4% of total annual global turnover, whichever is greater.

The guidance consists of a checklist that aims to provide clear direction on how organizations can prepare for compliance with the GDPR in Ireland.  However, organizations will find it useful when preparing for the GDPR anywhere in Europe.  The checklist is organized around the following twelve points.


Continue Reading The Irish Data Protection Commissioner Issues the GDPR Preparation Checklist