Prevention, Crisis Management, and Mitigating Personal Liability

Thursday, January 31, 2019
8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Breakfast & Registration
8:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Program

Seyfarth Shaw LLP New York Office
The New York Times Building
620 Eighth Avenue
New York, NY 10018

Seyfarth Attorneys:

Kevin Lesinski
Richard Lutkus
Gregory Markel
William Prickett

There is no cost to attend but registration is required and seating is limited.

This program will provide Boards, C-Suites and General Counsels with best practice strategies for avoiding unauthorized breaches of electronic data; managing them if they occur; and addressing personal liability risks for Boards and executives. The Distinguished Speakers are experienced cyber security experts from Seyfarth Shaw, KPMG, law enforcement, and current directors.

Best Practices for Avoiding and Managing Threats

Cybersecurity experts and industry professionals will share their views on these questions:

  • What are your top lessons learned from investigating cyber breach incidents?
  • What are the most important considerations when developing an overall incident response plan?

Potential Liability Risk for the Board 

Securities litigators will emphasize the importance of having a clear plan and robust escalation processes to respond quickly and effectively when an incident occurs. Critical issues to be discussed include:

  • Fiduciary duties and director liability
  • Cyber risk landscape and regulatory environment
  • Role of information governance in minimizing damages from cyberattacks
  • Cyber risk assessment and implementation of defensive technology
  • Insurance coverage and other risk mitigation strategies

Two hours of New York CLE credits are approved.

If you have any questions, please contact Morgan Coury at mcoury@seyfarth.com and reference this event.

Seyfarth Shaw Partner Jordan Vick is on the panel for the “Playing by the Rules: Rule Changes Essential to Your Practice” session on Friday, November 16, at Georgetown Law’s 15th annual Advanced eDiscovery Institute in Washington, D.C.

Session topics include:

  • The 2015 Amendments to the FRCP and their actual impacts on practitioners, including unintended consequence
  • How the changes to Federal Rule of Evidence 902 will change how parties and the court can streamline authentication of ESI and potentially eliminate the need to call a witness at trial
  • What other changes the Rules Committee is discussing that may impact eDiscovery professionals
  • Pilot accelerated disclosures and their impacts in Illinois and Arizona, including the Mandatory Initial Discovery Pilot Program (“MIDP”) in the Northern District of Illinois

For more information, to see the full schedule, or to register, click here.

Seyfarth Shaw Offers Data Privacy & Protection in the EU-U.S. Desktop Guide and On-Demand Webinar Series

On May 25, 2018, the EU General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) will impose significant new obligations on all U.S. companies that handle personal data of any EU individual. U.S. companies can be fined up to €20 million or 4% of their global annual revenue for the most egregious violations. What does the future passage of GDPR mean for your business?

Seyfarth’s eDiscovery and Information Governance (eDIG) and Global Privacy and Security (GPS) practitioners are pleased to announce the release of Data Privacy & Protection in the EU-U.S.: What Companies Need to Know Now, which describes GDPR’s unique legal structure and remedies, and includes tips and strategies in light of the future passage of the GDPR.

How to Get Your Desktop Guide:

To request the Data Privacy & Protection in the EU-U.S. Desktop Guide as a pdf or hard copy, please click the button below:

GDPR Webinar Series

Throughout August and October of 2017, Seyfarth Shaw’s attorneys provided high-level discussions on risk assessment tools and remediation strategies to help companies prepare and reduce the cost of EU GDPR compliance. Each segment is one hour long and can be accessed on-demand at Seyfarth’s Carpe Datum Law Blog and The Global Privacy Watch Blog.

For updates and insight on GDPR, we invite you to click here to subscribe to Seyfarth’s Carpe Datum Law Blog and here to subscribe to Seyfarth’s The Global Privacy Watch Blog.

On May 25, 2018, the EU General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) will impose significant new obligations on all U.S. companies that handle personal data of any EU individual. U.S. companies can be fined up to €20 million or 4% of their global annual revenue for the most egregious violations. What does the future passage of GDPR mean for your business?

Our experienced eDiscovery and Information Governance (eDIG) and Global Privacy and Security (GPS) practitioners will present a series of four 1-hour webinars in August through October of 2017. The presenters will provide a high-level discussion on risk assessment tools and remediation strategies to help prepare and reduce the cost of EU GDPR compliance. Continue Reading Is your organization ready for the new EU General Data Protection Regulation?

The Trump transition team announced yesterday that Thomas Bossert was chosen for the role of the Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism.  In that position, Mr. Bossert will advise the President on issues related to cybersecurity, homeland security and counterterrorism, and also coordinate the process for creating and executing relevant policies, the announcement said.  The transition team further explained that Mr. Bossert’s position will be “independent” and on equal footing with the position of the national security adviser, Michael Flynn, who will focus on international security issues.

Mr. Bossert previously served as the Deputy Homeland Security Advisor to President George W. Bush.  In that capacity, he advised the President on matters of homeland and national security, counterterrorism, cybersecurity and continuity of operations.

“Tom brings enormous depth and breadth of knowledge and experience to protecting the homeland to our senior White House team,” said President-elect Trump. “He has a handle on the complexity of homeland security, counterterrorism, and cybersecurity challenges. He will be an invaluable asset to our Administration.”

Reflecting on his appointment, and with respect to cybersecurity, Mr. Bossert noted, “We must work toward cyber doctrine that reflects the wisdom of free markets, private competition and the important but limited role of government in establishing and enforcing the rule of law, honoring the rights of personal property, the benefits of free and fair trade, and the fundamental principles of liberty. The internet is a U.S. invention, it should reflect these U.S. values as it continues to transform the future for all nations and all generations.”

As the new Administration gets to work on ensuring cybersecurity, as part of the overall national and economic security, it will likely change the way U.S. companies are expected to secure their protected data.

shutterstock_196544378China has finalized a broad new Cyber Security Law, its first comprehensive data privacy and security regulation.  It addresses specific privacy rights previously adopted in the European Union and elsewhere such as access, data retention, breach notification, mobile privacy, online fraud and protection of minors.

There is plenty in the new law to irritate international businesses operating in China.  It requires in general that Chinese citizens’ data be stored only in China, for starters, possibly requiring global corporations to maintain separate IT systems for Chinese data.  Most of the privacy enhancements benefiting citizens align with those required in the European Union, but it is unclear how the Chinese will expect compliance, particularly since, as with many Chinese laws, its language is vague as to its scope, application and details.  This vagueness leaves interpretation to the State Council, the chief administrative authority in China, headed by Premier Li Keqiang.

The law expands Chinese authorities’ power to investigate even within a corporation’s Chinese data systems, and provides for draconian penalties for non-compliance by business entities or responsible individuals  include warnings, rectification orders, fines, confiscation of illegal gains, suspension of business operations or the revocation of the entity’s business license. Continue Reading China Finalizes New Cyber Security Law

WebinarDo you and your firm have adequate cybersecurity to prevent yourself (and your confidential client data) from getting hacked?

On Wednesday, December 7, at 11:00 a.m. Pacific, Richard Lutkus, a partner in Seyfarth Shaw’s eDiscovery and Information Governance Practice; and Joseph Martinez, Chief Technology Officer and Vice President of Forensics, eDiscovery & Information Security at Innovative Discovery, will present “A Big Target: Cybersecurity for Attorneys and Law Firms.”

This webinar will cover any considerations that attorneys should take into account when in possession of any client data from an information security perspective. Coverage will include both technical considerations, best practices and policies, as well as practical advice to steer clear of ethical violations.

This program will specifically address the following topics:

  • Information storage, retention, and remediation
  • Device management
  • Phishing and social engineering
  • Security considerations
  • Cloud storage and ethical considerations

Please join us for this informative webinar.

register button

 

We have all heard this before, but just how bad things really are? According to Verizon’s 2016 Data Breach Investigations Report (“DBIR”), insider and privilege misuse was once again one of the leading causes of incidents and breaches in 2015, accounting for 10,489 total incidents, 172 with confirmed data disclosure. Some of this misuse is perpetrated by malicious actors driven by motivation of financial gain and some of it is due to actions of well-meaning employees who either lacked cybersecurity awareness or simply made a mistake.

While there are no perfect answers for addressing the multitude of possible insider attacks, which can range from privilege abuse, to data mishandling, to the use of unapproved hardware, software, and workarounds, to email misuse, implementing the steps below can go a long way in reducing the risks.

Five Steps to Reduce Insider Misuse

Continue Reading Employers, Your Worst Cybersecurity Threat May Already Be on Your Payroll